24th May 2017

 

On Sat, Jun 3, 2017 at 6:49 PM <newbrunswick@charter.net> wrote:

Hi Logan

We had a great time. 

Besides the Kudu and Black Wildebeast, he has lots of others species. 

My favorite is the Gemsbok. We saw at least four herds over the 8500 acres.

I highly recommend this experience, it was great.

Before you go, may sure you can shoot 250 to 350 yards standing off sticks (tripod) and hit a 6" target. I shot my Springbok (which is very small) at over 300 yards. It was a real challenge, since he kept moving.

I brought a tripod from here and it is the best $50, I have ever spent.

If you have other questions please let me known.

James

 

-----------------------------------------

From: "Mickey Parent" 

To: "Logan Sheets"

Cc: "newbrunswick@charter.net", "holmessafaris@gmail.com"

Sent: 03-Jun-2017 12:14:32 +0000

Subject: Re: Richard Holmes Question

 

 

Logan:

 

Happy to fill you in on the details of my kudu hunt. Like you, kudu was my main focus for the safari....those spiral antlers have been a passion for me since I was a young man. John, our PH was upfront about the hunt from the start cautioning us that a good bull may take a few days to chase down. This was a little nerve racking for me as my buddy and I were sharing our PH and I didn't want my kudu hunt to hog all our time...luckily, that wasn't the case.

We hunted kudu on the second morning our the hunt. Since kudu was to be my prized hunt, John smartly suggested we hunt wildebeest the first day to give us some time out in the field to build some confidence. It worked out good. We both shot blacks the first day and went after the kudu feeling like seasoned safari hunters.

As mention previously, a severe drought had reduced Richards herd of kudu, but the concession owners in the area work together to ensure hunters get the game they desire...so we hunted a neighboring property for my bull. We glassed the mountains all morning and saw several immature bulls but nothing worth shooting. We were headed to another property when John decided to try one last valley. After glassing for 15 minutes, one of our spotters/skinners spotted a nice bull....and the race was on!! He was far....say 500 yards on the side of the mountain. We grabbed the sticks and tried to close the distance before he disappeared. We ran through woods the get near the base of the mountain and John called out the range....300!! The bull kept moving with the cows for another 25-30 yards then stopped. John had warned us earlier that they'll stop only for a few seconds to look back but then go again...so I knew I only had a few seconds. I don't mind saying...I was nervous as hell!!! But once I got the rifle onto the sticks and saw him through the scope I settled down, took a slow aim and shot...he went down immediately. Wow!!! What an experience!!!! 

Reality set in after that when I looked up at the bull....he was a long way up the mountain....and it was a big bull. It took 5 of us about an hour and a half to get he bull down from the mountain since it was pretty steep. But it was all worth it and a great memory for me. The pictures you see on Richards website were taken when we finally got to the base of the mountain. 

The eastern cape of SA has the cape kudu rather than the greater kudu in the north...so 40" is a good trophy. Mine measured in at just that. That doesn't mean they are small...with mine weighing in at about 450. I took him with a 7mm mag...using 165 gr Sierra gameking bullets. My scope was a leupold 4-12x. This I recommend without hesitation since many shots can be out this far. Also..you may consider a sunshade for your scope...I had to pass on one shot at Impala since glare was obstructing my sight picture. You'll also need good binos...10x is perfect. If you can't glass comfortable for for several hours in a day with your current set..buy new ones. This trip was the first time I've ever done this much glassing, having always hunted in the east in Canada/us and I loved it. I just wished I'd spent a little more on my glass. 

As far Taxidermy Africa...you'd be hard pressed to find a more professional outfit. We were in SA during a national holiday, but they were committed to meeting with us before we left the country. We had a sit down with them at the airport and they spent all the time we needed going over our options. Absolutely no pressure on your preference to mount or pack....whichever was best for you. In the end, I opted for the dip and pack and my buddy will have them do his mounts. They really take care of everything for the pickup and you are kept up to date with every move your trophies make. Since we haven't received the trophies, I can't comment on their work.

Their you have it. One satisfied hunters experience...hope it was helpful.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

 

Mickey

Sent from my iPad

 

From: Mickey Parent 
Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 11:15 AM
To: Cary Mcafee 
Cc: newbrunswick@charter.net ; holmessafaris@gmail.com 
Subject: Re: Richard Holmes Safaris
Hello Cary:
  Glad to advise on our experience with Richard Holmes Safaris. Our trip went incredible well. Both my buddy and I got all the animals we wanted during this safari and even had some extra time at the end of our 6 days to do some photography and exploring (you definitely want to try their rope bridge for a 10 minute walk back from the main road). The land is over 8500 acres with very diverse landscape (plains, hills, heavy trees, etc). The game is plentiful but not overly easy to get clean shots at which was just what we wanted. If you're after 5-8 game...a week will be plenty...and you'll get great trophies. His herds are well managed to always have good trophies to choose from. Our PH was John and he's a great guy...worked really hard to get us on the animals and knew we weren't adverse to working hard to get good trophies (If he's your PH, be sure to bring him a bag of candy..he has a real sweet tooth). The Gemsbok hunts were the best involving several hours of stalking  to get the right shot (they really bunch up and are pretty skittish) . Expect shots 150 out to 325. We used sitting and standing sticks but the grass was long a month ago so we mostly used the standing stick. It may be shorter now with winter coming on. Make sure you practice from them...at least 100 round to be proficient....its a must.  I did most of my practice sitting and wasn't as proficient as my buddy and it showed. My Kudu was hunted on neighboring land due to Richards herd being adversely effected by a major drought they had a couple years ago. It was only a short drive and I got him after a couple hours of glassing the mountains...330 yards...great experience.  5 guys, 1.5 hours to get him down...I'll never forget the experience.  For cloths, a camo fleece was needed (or a light jacket) in the mornings (50f-60f), but by 8:30-9:00 it warmed up to 80-85. Short sleeve safari shirt worked great for me...very comfortable..with light weight pants. Any brown/beige camo will do, though we did spend a bit of time in the heavy trees, where darker would be better ...but we had no issues. 
  Richards place is buy no means a "5 Star" outfit. But you get plenty of wild game in the evening for every dinner which is great. The rooms are very comfortable and the staff really takes care of you..with laundry service every day if you want. We liked the camp area very much with the lodge, fire pit and open bar to sit around and relax. Leftovers are available 24 hours/day for snacking. They also have great SA wines to choose from. The conversations at dinner were always very interesting. Richard has a long history as a PH himself and has some good stories. 
  Like you, we got references  before we signed up and and we got exactly the same as I'm giving you. Great game, very warm and friendly folks, and just an easy going camp to wind down in. I would absolutely recommend using Afton House..when you arrive in J'burg. Great service to spend the first night in SA as you won't make the flight to P.E....at least not if you come direct from Atlanta like we did. We split the room cost which was about 50 bucks each. Includes pick up, help clear you guns, out to restaurant for a great meal (this is extra), nice room for the night, breakfast and drop off at airport. Can't beat it. 
  SA Airway is a great service...and Richard met us at Port Elizabeth and then drove us the 3.5 hours north to his property. Dropped us off again at the end. He contacted Afton house to meet us again in J'Burg to clear our guns going home as well. You can be very comfortable in all the travel inside SA....they have it well arranged. 
  Hope this help make up you're mind. 
Mickey Parent
 P.S. We spoke to many folks going home by the way, and I think for much,much less money, we had as good or better a hunt as any of them...because we wanted to actually hunt.  Many others we spoke to were in fixed blinds, box blinds by water holes or salt licks and such....which must have sucked. Some have monster trophies, but the experience was I what I remember...the stalking, the misses (my Impala gave me fits and I missed it twice) and the work to get my kudu...thats what I remember when I look at my pictures. 

From: Mickey Parent 

Sent: Tuesday, May 23, 2017 11:15 AM

To: Cary Mcafee 

Cc: newbrunswick@charter.net ; holmessafaris@gmail.com 

Subject: Re: Richard Holmes Safaris


Hello Cary:


  Glad to advise on our experience with Richard Holmes Safaris. Our trip went incredible well. Both my buddy and I got all the animals we wanted during this safari and even had some extra time at the end of our 6 days to do some photography and exploring (you definitely want to try their rope bridge for a 10 minute walk back from the main road). The land is over 8500 acres with very diverse landscape (plains, hills, heavy trees, etc).

The game is plentiful but not overly easy to get clean shots at which was just what we wanted. If you're after 5-8 game...a week will be plenty...and you'll get great trophies. His herds are well managed to always have good trophies to choose from. Our PH was John and he's a great guy...worked really hard to get us on the animals and knew we weren't adverse to working hard to get good trophies (If he's your PH, be sure to bring him a bag of candy..he has a real sweet tooth).

The Gemsbok hunts were the best involving several hours of stalking  to get the right shot (they really bunch up and are pretty skittish) . Expect shots 150 out to 325. We used sitting and standing sticks but the grass was long a month ago so we mostly used the standing stick. It may be shorter now with winter coming on. Make sure you practice from them...at least 100 round to be proficient....its a must.  I did most of my practice sitting and wasn't as proficient as my buddy and it showed.

My Kudu was hunted on neighboring land due to Richards herd being adversely effected by a major drought they had a couple years ago. It was only a short drive and I got him after a couple hours of glassing the mountains...330 yards...great experience.  5 guys, 1.5 hours to get him down...I'll never forget the experience.  For cloths, a camo fleece was needed (or a light jacket) in the mornings (50f-60f), but by 8:30-9:00 it warmed up to 80-85. Short sleeve safari shirt worked great for me...very comfortable..with light weight pants. Any brown/beige camo will do, though we did spend a bit of time in the heavy trees, where darker would be better ...but we had no issues. 


  Richards place is buy no means a "5 Star" outfit. But you get plenty of wild game in the evening for every dinner which is great. The rooms are very comfortable and the staff really takes care of you..with laundry service every day if you want. We liked the camp area very much with the lodge, fire pit and open bar to sit around and relax. Leftovers are available 24 hours/day for snacking. They also have great SA wines to choose from. The conversations at dinner were always very interesting. Richard has a long history as a PH himself and has some good stories. 


  Like you, we got references  before we signed up and and we got exactly the same as I'm giving you. Great game, very warm and friendly folks, and just an easy going camp to wind down in. I would absolutely recommend using Afton House..when you arrive in J'burg. Great service to spend the first night in SA as you won't make the flight to P.E....at least not if you come direct from Atlanta like we did. We split the room cost which was about 50 bucks each. Includes pick up, help clear you guns, out to restaurant for a great meal (this is extra), nice room for the night, breakfast and drop off at airport. Can't beat it. 

  SA Airway is a great service...and Richard met us at Port Elizabeth and then drove us the 3.5 hours north to his property. Dropped us off again at the end. He contacted Afton house to meet us again in J'Burg to clear our guns going home as well. You can be very comfortable in all the travel inside SA....they have it well arranged. 
  Hope this help make up you're mind. 


Mickey Parent


 P.S. We spoke to many folks going home by the way, and I think for much,much less money, we had as good or better a hunt as any of them...because we wanted to actually hunt.  Many others we spoke to were in fixed blinds, box blinds by water holes or salt licks and such....which must have sucked. Some have monster trophies, but the experience was I what I remember...the stalking, the misses (my Impala gave me fits and I missed it twice) and the work to get my kudu...thats what I remember when I look at my pictures. 

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